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Production: Sara Caddy, Garreth Evans. UK: Illuminations Films, , 86min, son.


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In: Humanities, 4, October , p. In: The Journal of Cinema and Media, v. ROOB, Alexander. Traduzido por Teresa Curvelo. RUDD, Anthony. In: Journal of religious ethics, v. The rings of Saturn. Translated by Michael Hulse.

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Beckett has long been associated with French existentialism and its preoccupation with the paradoxes of "extreme situations" waiting, suffering, dying -- and writing! As if one could redeem catastrophe by not averting one's eyes but only, as Stanley Cavell would say, by acknowledging its implacable reality and the claim this has on our capacity for empathy and compassion -- and perhaps even the amusement or is it bemusement?

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The absurd man, said Camus, knows that in this world "there is no further place for hope. As Hugh Kenner observed, in hearing Beckett's dialogue, we also "hear ourselves betrayed into laughter. And therein, as Levin argues in the final volume of his trilogy, lies the redemptive power of Beckett's words -- the way they violate the decorum of misery that Beckett's characters are forced, endlessly but finally comically, to preserve. Levin is drawn almost exclusively to Beckett's later fiction, principally Comment c'est , an work of parataxis or "sentence-fragments that have been assembled to form blocks of text with no punctuation marks at all and with no obvious principles of coherence, unity, and temporality in operation" p.

Beckett's Words: The Promise of Happiness in a Time of Mourning (Paperback)

Parataxis, as Lyotard observed, frees language from the logical and cognitive "regimens" that otherwise assemble us into hypotactic forms of life that require us to keep in step. The sea of mud through which the narrator travels to and from Pim is a world of each against all -- tormentors and victims -- but Levin brings Hegel to the rescue by figuring their brutal encounter in which the narrator pummels Pim as a master-slave dialectic that eventually resolves itself into a possible relation of " mutual recognition and mutual acknowledgment": arguably a shadow, at least, of justice p.

If : that is to say, "no knowing. The open unanswerable question is: hope for what?


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  8. Perhaps simply a final freedom from how it is:. Yet in all likelihood even death will be withheld. One can't help recalling the last words of Beckett's Unnamable: "you must go on, I can't go on, I'll go on. Knopf, , p. Martin's Press, , esp. Sebald February July ," ed.

    Redeeming Words: Language and the Promise of Happiness in the Stories of Döblin and Sebald

    You are here Home. By David Michael Kleinberg-Levin.

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    Description At stake in this book is a struggle with language in a time when our old faith in the redeeming of the word-and the word's power to redeem-has almost been destroyed. Drawing on Benjamin's political theology, his interpretation of the German Baroque mourning play, and Adorno's critical aesthetic theory, but also on the thought of poets and many other philosophers, especially Hegel's phenomenology of spirit, Nietzsche's analysis of nihilism, and Derrida's writings on language, Kleinberg-Levin shows how, because of its communicative and revelatory powers, language bears the utopian "promise of happiness," the idea of a secular redemption of humanity, at the very heart of which must be the achievement of universal justice.

    In an original reading of Beckett's plays, novels and short stories, Kleinberg-Levin shows how, despite inheriting a language damaged, corrupted and commodified, Beckett redeems dead or dying words and wrests from this language new possibilities for the expression of meaning. Without denying Beckett's nihilism, his picture of a radically disenchanted world, Kleinberg-Levin calls attention to moments when his words suddenly ignite and break free of their despair and pain, taking shape in the beauty of an austere yet joyous lyricism, suggesting that, after all, meaning is still possible.