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A Night Of Serious Drinking

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A Night of Serious Drinking at Threes Brewing - Brooklyn, NY - Events | Untappd

Manu Bazzano. Collected Later Poems. The Final Hike and the Soul at Bay. Roderick Grant. Jerusalem Deleted. Simon Jarvis. Redman, Greenman. Roy Conning. Mount Analogue. Rene Daumal. Le Contre-ciel. How to write a great review. The review must be at least 50 characters long.

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About AbeBooks. Other Popular Editions of the Same Title. Search for all books with this author and title. Customers who bought this item also bought. Stock Image. A night of serious drinking Daumal, Rene? Used Quantity Available: 1. Seller Rating:. It's also true that I'm lying. One there are many wonderful and great things in the world that make the world a pretty awesome place, I forget those things when I say something like Life is Shit.

I don't do this because I delude myself constantly that things really aren't that bad.

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Proposition two. Plato lied. In the allegory of the cave every philosophy student and wannabe intellectual jerk off learns a lesson that is incredibly hurtful to their development. In the cave story all these people are in a cave and they are dazzled by shadows on the wall, and they think it is the real world they are looking at. One dude, the philosopher, he wanders outside of the cave one day and sees that there is a real world everyone else is ignorant about.

He gets really excited and runs back to share this wonderful news with everyone else. They kill him. Because they are happy with the world they live in, they don't give a shit about this more real than real world, they just want to be left in peace, to look at their shadows, get drunk on unwatered down wine and fuck little boys this is Ancient Greece.

Sadly this story isn't meant as a cautionary tale when it's taught in schools, and I'm sure every philosophy student somewhere in their head gets the idea that they are learning about the Real world, not the shadowy world their parents and all those dolts live in.

A Night of Serious Drinking

These people will never understand them, but that won't stop them from being enormous pretentious dicks to just about anyone they talk to, because it's their evangelical mission to preach the Truth, just like some fucking Born Again. So what's so good about leaving the cave? I sort of give away the plot, but not really here A Night of Serious Drinking is about leaving the drunken deluded real world to go onto a higher one where people have escaped the shackles of mundane existence.

The narrator goes to see those who think they have escaped from the drunken world after a night of getting shit faced with a whole gaggle of people who ultimately annoy him. Right before he goes most of the party wanders off to find religion. The only way to escape this drunken world is to go mad or die. The narrators taken to see these mad people as a favor. What he finds is a whole new level of pretentious assholes who think that they are removed from the world and doing great things.

The narrator moves through different groups of people who have found their own ways of 'freedom', and finds each more annoying and stupid than the one before. Ultimately he returns home and falls into a despair that the world is totally shit with no hope. There is a bit of an upbeat ending tagged on to here too, and a really great quote but I can't seem to find my copy of the book so I'll just add it later.

The book offers no real hope. It's critical of all forms of escapism, and kind of maintains that without escapism the world is unbearable. Why this book what put out by an Eastern Religion publisher is beyond me. I don't see anything really Eastern about it except for a pretty amusing swipe at trendy followers of Buddhism was there a trend in this in the 's? This book feels really contemporary in its criticism, which just adds to my long standing idea that there were no good old days, people were just as dumb then as now and that maybe the Greatest Generation were just a bunch of assholes too, maybe prime assholes number one because they unleashed all kinds of insidious things on the world, marketed to a younger generation and then washed their hands of the whole thing, but then I think that the Baby-Boomers are really the assholes, but then there are the generations before those two and the ones to come, and maybe it's not one particular generation that is shit, but all generations right from Adam begetting Able right down to whoever was the last person to beget someone at the time of this writing.

Interesting stuff. View all 11 comments. Jul 13, Jimmy rated it really liked it Shelves: france , novel , male , years. If this book were written by anybody else, it would probably be a two or three star book. It's a bit too plainly allegorical, its critiques of society were a bit too simplistic, and its concluding sentiment was a bit too tidy. But even with all these faults, it's the particularities of Daumal's humor, his fantastical inventions, his logical propositions that lead inevitably to a higher non-sense, his wordplay and wit, his sincere truth-seeking always thirsting for transcendence , and his ultima If this book were written by anybody else, it would probably be a two or three star book.

But even with all these faults, it's the particularities of Daumal's humor, his fantastical inventions, his logical propositions that lead inevitably to a higher non-sense, his wordplay and wit, his sincere truth-seeking always thirsting for transcendence , and his ultimate quirky vision that saves this book from its larger faults. The parts are greater than the sum here. Perhaps Daumal knew this when he decided to include a 5 page index to this page book this is probably the shortest book I've ever read with a full index with entries as varied as 'young people', 'timeless truths', 'axolotl', 'dietary systems', 'Jarry, Alfred', 'bicycle made of gold ', 'Flatulencers', 'hashish', 'space secretion of ', 'pre-actors', 'caterpillar', 'useless gestures art of ', and 'ouroborism'.

View all 9 comments. Sep 18, Vit Babenco rated it it was amazing. What is a better occupation: to drink, to talk or to think? Drinking stimulates talking and talking stimulates thinking, or vice versa, or in any random order. Nov 02, Nate D rated it liked it Shelves: interwar-maladies , read-in , france. A Swiftian satiric travelogue through a version of the contemporary world that only needed to be very slightly reconfigured to fit Rene Daumal's concerns and frustrations with it. As Jimmy observes eloquently , there's pointed allegorical directness that would be limiting were not Daumal's imagination and wit so up to the task of getting beyond it despite his earnestness.

In particular, the insane bit at the end where the body and mind must recompose themselves out of the disorder of the prior ni A Swiftian satiric travelogue through a version of the contemporary world that only needed to be very slightly reconfigured to fit Rene Daumal's concerns and frustrations with it. In particular, the insane bit at the end where the body and mind must recompose themselves out of the disorder of the prior night, Daumal's narrator apparently encoutering Daumal himself, various fevered alcoholic hazes.

It's a shame that this is the only novel he managed to finish before his untimely death. Apr 11, Amy Rose rated it liked it. I'm not really sure what it is I just read. I need to process this May 04, Shawn rated it really liked it Shelves: r-nov-surrealthdno. This thin novel is the first substantial thing I've read by Daumal. It won't be the last, as I have Mount Analogue coming up soon on the reading list.

For those who know nothing about the book or the author, a word on what you're getting into with this work. At times, as another commentator here opined, I was reminded of my yout This thin novel is the first substantial thing I've read by Daumal.

Goodnight Rhonda Lee

At times, as another commentator here opined, I was reminded of my youthful reading of The Phantom Tollbooth , in the sense that we are taken to a magical land, purported to be a reflection of the real world, where we are introduced to various "types" that make up the society while offering the reader a satirical take on various ways we live our lives. As the introduction lays out, this was written after Dumal left his comfort zone of Parisian artistic circles "how narrow was his little circle of intellectuals and poets" and traveled to Depression-era New York City, looking to bruise himself into inspiration with the world "I needed a cruel city".

His thoughts and reflections then gave birth to this work, "born of a struggle between two [stools], quotidian sleep and expanded awareness. Our narrator eventually makes his way out of the vestibule of the novel and into the text proper as, creeping upstairs in search of an exit, he finds an impossibly large space "space is generated by need" that serves as a Accident Ward for those injured by the world, a space which opens even further into the land of "The Escapees" those who have created a false paradise for themselves in order to be convinced that they have left the Accident Ward - and, very importantly, they do NOT drink and one should never mention drinking.

The only other exits from the world, btw, are Death and Madness. From there on, it's a travelogue through all the varied ways people find for creating things of no importance, an absurd inverted world which serves as a symbolic commentary on Society, Education, the Arts, the Sciences, Religion, and Culture. There's some funny stuff here. A number of other reviewers seem to need to mention that the symbolic criticisms were "obvious", "easy" or "juvenile" but, hey, maybe they are all braniacs. To me, what was less interesting was identifying the actual target of the satire and more the way that Daumal presents them - these are not particularly scathing, or sharp, critiques, in fact there's something sympathetically understanding in them.

I also liked the "Chief Scienter" Professor Mumu who deserves to show up somewhere else and the Omniscienter all huge head and wizened, doll-like body - very Thomas Ligotti , who collates all data into a whole "I know everything, but I don't understand any of it". Are "Fabricators," who make useless things, mean to be abstract and conceptual artists? Are the "Passive Pwalts," producing profoundly-felt nonsense deliberately stripped of meaning, Dadaists? Who knows The ending, short as it is, is what made me bump this up a star.

Our narrator returns to "the real world" having dropped through a trapdoor from the world above he's surprised at how short the fall is and finds himself trapped in the empty tavern with no door and barred windows. He has to burn everything not nailed down including books for warmth, but then the room itself begins to transform, anthropomorphic and unruly ape-servants appear and And to top it all off, it has a positive, hopeful ending! Extremely enjoyable!

A Little Crazy

View all 3 comments. Apr 08, Kyle Muntz rated it really liked it. Equal parts satire and a survey of knowledge and language. It loses a little momentum around page 50 where things started to feel strung together and less able to compensate for the lack of characterization but this is one of the most inventive things I've read. Plus, near the beginning, there really is some serious drinking that goes on. There seems to be a few novels that have a plot that revolves around a certain intoxicating, para-reality. These novels have a whimsical, loopy tone that brings the reader on a puzzling journey.

These are not books simply about a drunken narrator, but a foray into a strange imaginative reality. In fact, reading this reminded me that I should finish Dante trilogy. The narrator starts drinking within the tavern drunkenly conversing to a group - he contemplates leaving, but finds he cannot leave. For those who attempt end up indefinitely stranded in the Sick Room found upstairs in tavern.

This room leads to a strange parallel universe. Like Dante, the narrator has a guide to describe and to help transverse this weird world made of Clarificators, Fabricators, and the other subgroups within. Daumal uses these strange categories of post-drinking types to satirize certain intellectual endeavors. A good review can be found here- if you want to explore this book in more depth. The language is simultaneously imaginative, sharp and quite funny. As you can see from this little dialogue- it happens when the guide and the narrator is wandering the land of the Fabricator — the guide asks some painters why they paint.

Appearances, however, are against me.


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For just as there is a level of pain at which the body ceases to feel because, should it become involved in its pain, should it groan but once, it would seemingly crumble and return to dust; and just as there is a peak at which pain takes to the air on its own wingsso there is a level of thought where words have no part to play. It is witty, poetic, inventive; however, it is also — unfortunately — a bit simplistic in its satire and overall themes.

Now I need to track down a cheap copy of Mount Analogue One of the strings caught him on the upper lip. He allowed a few drops of blood to fall onto the back of his hand. Then he drained his glass.

Then he jotted down in his notebook the rudiments of an extraordinary poem which would be plagiarized the following day and betrayed in every language by two hundred and twelve minor poets; from it sprang the same number of avant-garde artistic movements, twenty-seven historic brawls, three political revolutions on a Mexican farm, seven bloody wars on the Paropamisus, a famine in Gibraltar, a volcano in Gabon which had never been heard of before , a dictator in Monaco, and not quite lasting glory for the half-baked. How could a book this short be too long?

Still, I found the book to be hilarious throughout, even though there was only one joke repeated ad nauseam.

At first, a moment of exclamation. What a weird of one book it is! I came to know about Daumal by reading one of his poems in my feed. I was quite intrigued and determined to try one of his works.